TalentEgg Trends

Today’s Talent, Tomorrow’s Leaders

Knowledge Hub For Employers, Career Educators And Coaches

Category: Generation Z

Coaching – New Paradigm for Effective Leadership

Leadership is critical in today’s evolving business environment. Leadership affects the culture, people, and the organization’s overall ability to succeed. But the age-old question remains the same – what makes a good leader? We spoke with Susan Pahl, Founder & CEO Shift Coaching Inc., to get her perspective on leadership and the role coaching plays in leading a successful team.

Name: Susan Pahl

Occupation: Founder & CEO Shift Coaching Inc.

Susan Pahl is the CEO and Founder of Shift Coaching, a leadership development and corporate coaching company. Shift Coaching develops leaders, teams and organizations to adapt change and grow. 

“To me, leadership is not a position, a title or a set of traits. It is the ability to get others to want to work together and even struggle to achieve a shared goal. The ultimate form of leadership is to enable each member of the group to bring their best self and best efforts to bear on the goal at hand,” says Susan.

Analyzing the Trends

Susan engaged in extensive research to understand the new trends in leadership development and get ahead of the curve.  She was particularly struck by the data that showed the impact of coaching on productivity, culture and employee engagement in business across a variety of industries.

“According to a study by Bersin & Associates, now a part of Deloitte, leaders that coach are 130% more likely to realize stronger business results. In addition, organizations with a culture of coaching achieve 21% higher business results. These are astounding numbers. When your leaders use coaching as an integral tool of management, the business grows.”

Research by Zenger Folkman found that “more than 60% of employees who report to managers who are not good coaches are thinking about quitting.” This is based on more than 500,000 360-degree assessments on 50,000 leaders. Coaching is a fundamental tool to not only bring out the best in people, but retain them too.”

Susan also identified what many modern leaders struggle with. She describes how “command and control leaders rely on their own skills and abilities to solve problems and be the experts. This new world requires multiple people and multiple brains to be able to navigate this fast-paced increasingly complex world we live in.” Instead of taking an authoritative approach, Susan suggests that leaders need to know how to create “a collaborative work environment where people can think for themselves, solve problems and be innovative.”

Finding the Niche

The reality today is this: “There is no playbook or training program to address the complexity that people are facing today,” Susan comments. Constant adaptation to change, competition for attracting and retaining top talent as well as employee development are just some of the ongoing tasks that managers need to think about.

“The role of HR is changing. How do we prepare people to work, lead and learn effectively in the complex constantly changing world? To start we need to support HR professionals and career educators to become coaches and equip them with the skills to support others.”

Identifying the gap between employees’ expectations and managers’ ability to meet them, Susan came up with the idea for Shift Coaching. “I wanted to provide a program that covered all the essential elements of coaching in the context of the business environment with practice, reflection and feedback that would fit in with a business person’s busy schedule,” says Susan. She adds that “every leader needs A coach and that every leader needs TO coach.” So really, Susan teaches others to learn by doing. Those who participate in the program not only learn how to coach others, but they also get coached themselves.

Coaching Leaders

So how does The Shift Corporate Coach Program work? It is built for business leaders and it stands apart from other coaching programs because it incorporates the business context, is efficient and is integrated into the leaders’ workday. Unlike other programs that only provide a generic overview of coaching or require a significant time investment, Shift Coaching equips participants with practice, reflection and feedback that fits within a business person’s busy schedule.

Participants learn core coaching concepts through an experiential hands-on process. As a result of completing the program, according to Susan, leaders can:

  • Generate improved productivity
  • Reduce conflict across the organization
  • Increase the response to managing and implementing change
  • Use industry-leading leadership tools to grow staff and develop people 
  • Create a renewed vision and strength in their approach to developing the corporate culture
  • Create a greater focus on the art of relationship-building throughout the organization; with direct reports, peers, stakeholders and clients 
  • Explore the benefits of using coaching conversations in everyday applications as well as in formal protocols

Shift Corporate Coach Program recently opened up for new grads in an effort to shape the leaders of tomorrow early on.

“Becoming a coach early in a new grad’s career will prepare them to have healthy approaches to the people issues and have the ability to coach others, preparing them for positions of leadership. We have heard so many of our [more mature] participants say that they wished they had these skills 20-30 years ago and how their careers may have been very different. So we said: “Why wait?” – let’s bring this to new grads and help them get coaching skills early on.”

Constantly Evolving

It’s evident: the change is here. The massive challenge of adapting and evolving together with the industry is something that every business manager (current or aspiring) needs to embrace.

“Robert Keagan calls it “Constructive Destabilization” in his book “An Everyone Culture”. He says that, if you can perform your role to a high level, you are actually no longer in the right job. As soon as something is working perfectly, it is time to blow it up and move up to the next level. He suggests running into useful trouble and using this trouble to learn and grow. This is the opposite of “business as usual”. Pain + Reflection = Progress.”

Susan comments that HR professionals will only be able to grow by introducing desirable and purposeful challenges in their work lives. Learning and development programs are a safe way of practicing to combat these difficulties.

“Ongoing development must be woven into the daily fabric of working life and people’s limitations will be seen as their growing edge. Organizations need to aggressively seek opportunities for their leaders to practice, experiment and learn in this new changing environment. They also need to change how they evaluate and develop leaders,” says Susan. Her passion for better leaders of tomorrow is evident in everything she does.

If you’re ready for the next step in your leadership development, explore what Shift Coaching has to offer. Do you know a soon to be or a recent grad that might benefit from the Shift Corporate Coach Program™️?

TalentEgg is proud to partner with Shift Coaching to offer young professionals an exceptional leadership development opportunity give-away valued at $5,000! Find out more here!  

Your Complete Guide to Canadian Campus Recruitment

The eighth annual TalentEgg National Campus Recruitment Excellence Awards and Conference took place on Wednesday, June 19th, 2019 and we are happy to say that it was an egg-cellent day of learning and collaborating on best practices in student, new graduate and early career recruitment. The TalentEgg Awards and Conference marks a moment when employers, nonprofits, campus recruitment professionals, and career educators come together for a day to discuss different approaches to support youth employment and professional development. We would like to sincerely thank everyone who joined us for the event, and we can't wait to see you next year!

All Awards and Conference attendees got to take home our 2019 Guide to Canadian Campus Recruitment. This valuable resource gives employers and HR professionals crucial insights into recruiting Gen-Y and Gen-Z job candidates, including best practices, tips on how to use social media effectively, and what matters most to students, new graduates and early career professionals when it comes to starting their careers.

If you missed out on the conference, you can still access TalentEgg's key findings from our Gen-Y and Gen-Z research and recruitment insights gained from our work with the Student Judges of the TalentEgg Awards! We’re offering a free digital download of the 2019 Guide to Canadian Campus Recruitment right here!

Here’s a sneak peek of what you’ll find in the 2019 Guide:

  • Candidates' recruitment pet peeves
  • Why your employer brand needs CSR
  • Unique experiences to develop your future talent pipeline
  • Connecting with early-career professionals
  • Why and how to connect online with potential candidates
  • How your recruitment efforts can be everywhere, all at once
  • The importance of continuous learning and incorporating it into your onboarding
  • …and more!

Get your free copy of this essential resource!


2019 Guide to Canadian Campus Recruitment

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Company

Getting to know generation Z

This article was originally published on HR Reporter

Aislin Roth experienced a whirlwind day in a CEO’s shoes in February. The 21-year-old commerce student at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., worked alongside Caroline Riseboro, president and CEO of Plan International Canada, a children’s rights advocate organization in Toronto.

The partnership was part of CEOx1Day, a program organized by executive search firm Odgers Berndtson Canada that paired 18 CEOs with students from universities and colleges across the country. “The value of the experience comes as the CEO earns an opportunity to pass strategy by the next generation, while the student has access to the process of running a major organization,” said Jacqueline Foley, chief marketing officer at Odgers Berndtson Canada in Toronto. “The connections that happen between the students and the CEOs are quite significant and some stay in touch,” she said.

“The CEOs just really enjoy that opportunity to spend a day with these really bright, motivated students and, of course, the students get all kinds of benefits out of the day, as well. They’ve got lots of skills and lots of potential and lots of ambition, but that day with the CEO allows them to really see what leadership is all about.”

One-on-one time

Roth’s day included one-on-one time with Riseboro, an opportunity to participate in an executive management team meeting, and a local event called “Equal Voice” promoting the election of more female politicians. The executive meeting was a highlight for Roth.

“It was great to get to see — at such a high level — how they’re thinking about the organization’s strategic objectives three years out, five years out, what the long-term vision is, and how at a high level, the strategy all fits together,” she said.

Plan International’s youth engagement and marketing teams solicited Roth’s opinions in terms of her typical interactions with non-profit organizations. “I tried to bring a fresh, outsider’s perspective of someone who doesn’t necessarily know a lot about Plan International,” she said. “Real-life experience as a young female in male-dominated workplaces fuelled her contribution to the discussions,” said Roth. “It’s been an incredible experience,” she said. “It’s given me a lot more respect for some of the challenges leaders face, and the things that motivate them to come into work every day.

Riseboro shared advice on managing differing opinions, the importance of showing concern for personal well-being and work-life balance, as well as strategies to better prioritize work objectives. “A key takeaway has been ‘How do you make sure you’re spending your time on the things that help the organization the most?’” said Roth. “As a CEO, you have so many people asking for your time.”

Insights for leaders

Now in its sixth year, the CEOx1Day program is meant to provide insights into current business environments for both current and future leaders, said Foley. “Companies today are really looking to engage their employees more, and connect to the future — the high potentials, the next generation — and keep them engaged.” Knowing Roth wanted to connect the dots between learned theory and real-life business activity, Plan International worked hard to create opportunities where she could meaningfully engage in discussion, said Riseboro. “We were really purposeful to have Aislin be part of our executive management team and feed into the discussion and give us advice on some of the topics that we were covering.”

Riseboro appreciated getting a sense of where the next generation of leaders find value. “We are trying to solve century-old problems of poverty and gender inequality, and we want to attract the best and brightest minds like Aislin and others,” she said. “Plan’s mission is really trying to advance children’s rights and equality for girls. It’s so important to expose young women to CEO roles and leadership roles. Because often what we find is that young girls actually perceive that they have fewer opportunities because of their gender.” 

“While her eventual career remains unknown, a leadership position is on the radar”, said Roth. Ideally, she’d like to join a team with international scope that is intellectually curious and includes participants from diverse backgrounds.

Gen Z arrives

For the first time, participating organizations in CEOx1Day welcomed gen Z participants — age 21 and under.

Mary Barroll, president of TalentEgg, an employment agency in Toronto that supports CEOx1Day, comments on this. “The priorities of generation Z are unlike those of its predecessors,” she said. “It has a great deal to do with the fact that they were raised in the shadow of a recession — a very different time than when many millennials were raised… growing up in a booming economy where there were endless opportunities.” “Gen Z workers respond best to employers that care less about the bottom line and more about making a positive impact on society via meaningful employee experiences”, said Barroll. They are expected to stay in their first job longer, looking for skills development over and above compensation. Unlike millennials, it’s less about flextime and more about experience, skills development and direct contact with supervisors, she said.

“Their attitudes towards work are quite different in terms of job security,” said Barroll. “Allowing them an opportunity to see how they could progress, and giving them guidance about what steps to take in order to succeed… is really important.” Alongside consistent stimulation and learning, an inclusive culture with a focus on corporate social responsibility is very important to gen Z workers, she said.  Employers may need to revamp recruitment and benefit practices to adapt to the influx of these workers, said Barroll. “Organizations should highlight their commitment to their core values — as reflected by their corporate social responsibility initiatives — and develop volunteer programs that build deeper relationships with young talent.” “A lot of that has been addressed in some big organizations,” she said. “Many others have not… adapted to the new reality and are still utilizing things that used to work in the past. And they’re really challenged when they’re in a competitive environment for top talent — positioning themselves in the best light possible — because they haven’t understood that the values of young people today are quite different than those were 20 years ago.”

Differing motivations or not, ambition, curiosity, resilience and the ability to inspire will continue to be core leadership skills — both today and tomorrow, said Jacqueline Foley, chief marketing officer at Odgers Berndtson Canada, the organization behind CEOx1Day.

“The skills that make leaders successful today are still very much the skills that we see in these future leaders.”

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